Addiction & Ecopsychology

W&W uprightI recently held a workshop at Wild & Well Festival in Bristol. In keeping with the festival’s focus on physical, mental and emotional health and the outdoors the workshop was an exploration of the potential role of Nature in addiction recovery. I am enormously excited to bring this perspective to the recovery community. For although there is a tradition of alternative nature-based therapeutic modalities being used in addiction treatment programmes these are usually fringe elements of the treatment process: some bushcraft skills here; a little equine-assisted therapy there. In practice Nature’s provision sadly remains a vast and largely untapped resource when it comes to counselling and psychotherapy.

This shouldn’t come as any surprise. It is becoming increasingly clear that we are operating in a culture that does not meaningfully value the natural world. Commonly, we see it as a material resource, often failing to recognize its vast contribution to our psychological, emotional and spiritual wellbeing. We have evolved within the crucible of the natural world so our psychological makeup is indivisible from the natural and archetypal forces that have shaped us. Remove our connection to it and what happens?

https___www.health.harvard.edu_newsletter_article_a-prescription-for-better-health-go-alfresco-2More concerning still is the march of economic and technological “progress” that fails to recognise our interdependence with the environment within which we exist, and upon which our physical survival depends. We are perilously close to irreversibly depleting the very ecosystems that sustain human life.

This, to me, seems like an astonishing and not-unrelated societal parallel to the individual who is caught up in an unhealthy and unsustainable way of living, who ignores the warning bells tolling around him, who rationalizes short-termism despite the consequences, who ignores his actions’ violations of his values driven by his own blind need for more, who denies his own humanity in order to avoid his discomfort. In short, it seems like excellent modelling of addiction by society to the individual. Is it any surprise we have widespread expressions of addictive states across society with our institutions and cultural systems giving this example?

i283163839597023725._szw480h1280_.jpgOne of the wonderful things about living in these precipitous times is that there is an explosion of awareness about these concerns. We see the shift in public consciousness regarding plastics that has taken place over the last year or so and the resulting votes on eradicating the use of single plastics. Within the humanitarian sphere there are growing branches of therapeutic disciplines and psychological enquiry that come under various titles depending on the focus: nature-based therapy, eco-therapy, wilderness therapy, ecopsychology and so on. This movement has various roots stemming from outdoor enthusiasts to activism but it began to formally cohere in the 1980’s when Edward O Wilson came up with the Biophilia hypothesis in which he theorised that humans have an inbuilt connection to nature.

This hypothesis is in line with many people’s reported experience in recovery. Many of us cite nature as a nurturing, restorative factor in our recovery process. But what is it that we’re experiencing when we feel restored by nature? What does this balming effect have to do with our addictive processes? Are our increasingly urban and technologically-oriented lives affecting our capacity to feel our place in the evolutionary order of things, and how might this impact our choices and patterns as individuals and societies?

I am devising a nature-based retreat programme for addicts in recovery to explore these questions and deepen a relationship with the natural world. It will include eco-therapy practices, solo time in nature, group harvesting and reflections to help each participant to come into connection with themselves and their environments – their essential nature. They will be held in the beautiful, verdant lands of Devon near Totnes and come closer to finding their own path through the nature-connected wilderness of our times.

If these issues and deepening your own recovery process are of interest to you then please check back here soon for announcements on the first retreat in 2018, or get in touch and I’ll be sure to let you know when dates have been set.

 

Now Offering Online Counselling

It has been an interesting and unexpected process for me to shift from exclusively embodied therapy into the ‘virtual’ medium. I was skeptical of online counseling. As someone who places huge importance on the quality of the therapeutic relationship as a predictor of successful outcomes in therapy, and the necessity of shared physical presence to read and track the subtle energetic interplay between therapist and client I underestimated the potential of online therapy. So it was not a planned work strategy. It began by chance.

Some previous clients got back in touch when they needed extra support. As I’m no longer in Bristol or, indeed, London and they didn’t want to go through the process of finding and establishing rapport with a new therapist I cautiously offered them cyber sessions over video link. To my surprise the majority seemed to significantly benefit from the experience. They gave positive feedback and chose to continue working in this format. Clinically they appeared to be receiving similar benefits to those they had displayed in conventional therapy.

Initially I was astonished to find that really meaningful work could still be achieved online with previous clients with whom I already had a working relationship. But could this stretch to people with whom there was no previous connection? Would it be possible, having never sat across the room from someone, never shaken them by the hand, never had the reference of their physical presence, to form a tenable bond that could tether us effectively enough to withstand the challenges of therapy?

I am finding that there are inevitable drawbacks. Sometimes I miss the palpable immediacy of being in the same room together. Visual cues from seeing the whole human body in front of you are lost. Sometimes I want to give a client some particular handouts or together look over therapeutic assignments they’ve done.

But I’m finding that the lost benefits of face to face work can be balanced with added benefits from new elements. The saving of time, resources and energy that are spent in travelling both for the client and therapist allow for those resources to be channeled elsewhere. For the client being in one’s own home – not having to battle one’s way home when feeling raw and emotional – can be a huge attraction. For those who struggle to reveal aspects of themselves face to face the perceived anonymity of meeting via screen can help ease the fear of self-disclosure.

I take care to explain the pros and cons of working in this medium to potential clients and refer them to therapists in their location if it’s decided that they would benefit more from the tangible connection. In assessment the nature of their issues also determines whether it would feel appropriate to do online work versus the more grounded option. If on reflection and discussion there are no significant perceived drawbacks we give it a try. Thus far it’s been a mutually rewarding experience and I’ll continue to offer online therapy moving forwards.

Counselling In Devon

My counselling practice has now moved from Bristol to Devon. I am seeing clients for sessions at The Nautilus Rooms, Totnes and The Practice Rooms, Exeter. I am also conducting online therapy sessions via video platform.

When I initially moved down to Devon, knowing it would take a fair while to build up a practice in a new area, I decided to team up with The Kusnacht Practice and Brevin Healthcare. They offer individualized high end care for people who want a rounded package of support covering their psychiatric, psychotherapeutic and medical care. It took me to Zurich, Dubai, Kuwait and London where I was delivering intensive bouts of counselling for those with whom I worked. I feel very privileged to have had that opportunity to learn new ways of working that have strengthened my capacity to be flexible in the face of unusual circumstances and needs, as well as the benefits of solid therapeutic boundaries.

Having now settled in the South Hams and put my roots firmly down in the ochre soil of southern Devon I’ve found rooms to practice in both Totnes and Exeter. I am relishing the return to the gentle, steady power of weekly sessions with clients and the space this gives me to deepen connections with family, friends, the myriad progressive projects in the local community and, of course, the landscape itself.

I have established connections with two esteemed local organizations that I feel proud to support. Last season I ran a weekly therapeutic group for the “Becoming Indigenous’ course participants, providing reflective space for people to integrate their experiences and process dynamics within the group. I have stepped up to be a trustee of Write to Freedom – an innovative and transformational charity devoted to supporting addicts and young offenders to reclaim their potential through nature therapy, myth and creative writing. Last year I co-facilitated a monthly ‘grief circle’- a voluntary offering for any in the community seeking a place to touch, express and share their grief.

At The Nautilus Rooms in Totnes where I practice I am happy to be surrounded by a range of therapists, with a broad and suitably colourful array of therapeutic styles being offered. If you would like an assessment for Counselling in South Devon please contact me.

Mindfulness Therapy in Bristol

What is Mindfulness? We hear it spoken of more and more regularly. Indeed it has become something of a “buzzword” in recent years. But what does it actually mean and what are the real benefits, if any, that it can bring?

A sense of awareness of the present moment lies at the heart of what it means to cultivate mindfulness. Jon Kabat-Zinn, the prime exponent of mindfulness in Western medical and psychological settings, defines it as follows: “Mindfulness means paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment and non-judgementally.” In other words it is about getting a handle on your “thinking mind”.

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If we can bring some more perspicacity to each moment we can begin to see the processes that occur within us at any given time. We can see the subtle sensations, thoughts and feelings that lie behind our actions and motivate our behaviour. We can begin to choose how we react to the stimuli around us, and even influence our habitual moods and emotional states. At the very least we can begin to develop an attitude of kindness towards ourselves, and others, in our moment-to-moment experience.

How do we actually do it? Mindfulness is generally thought to originate in Eastern spiritual traditions but also has flowered in various Western contexts. However, it has only become widespread in the West in the latter part of the 20th Century. With all this history behind it there are many techniques available but to begin with it’s about bringing the mind under control. Not by forcing anything or shutting anything out, but by developing the ability to maintain attention on the object of meditation. Commonly the breath is used as a focus, or “anchor” to the present moment, because it is always available and brings us into contact with our bodily sensory field. By simply paying attention to the sensations we experience with each breath – in and out – we are able to shift attention away from our thoughts and develop stability of awareness.

Following this simple practice can reveal quite how powerful and insistent the mind’s thinking processes are! When I sit down and meditate I find a tendency for my thoughts to focus again and again on different ideas and plans for the future – from anything as banal as the shopping list to an exciting creative project. It has been very helpful to discover that, with practice, I can relinquish the planning and settle into the present moment. For although the planning is helpful and necessary in moderation, it often undermines my actual enjoyment of what’s going on right now as I’m too busy planning the next thing!

In this small way Mindfulness can help with the majority of psychological difficulties we face. Habitual emotional states that are causing distress, such as anxiety, anger or depression, can be altered through creating this space around the emotional experience and gaining the ability to intervene in negative cycles of thought. With the awareness of what’s happening inside we get to identify what we’re feeling and respond appropriately instead of acting unconsciously and doing what we’ve always done. In this way it can be very helpful with compulsive behaviours such as addictions and eating disorders.

It can be argued that a great deal of psychological suffering is exacerbated by the avoidance of uncomfortable emotion. Perhaps more importantly than any other benefit, Mindfulness enables us to “be” with our experience and develop the equanimity to move through and beyond turbulent waters.

The Science of Self-harm

Why do people hurt themselves?

Imagine you are feeling really upset. Something is going on inside but you may not even know what – you just know a rising sense of desperation and overwhelm is happening and you feel like you can’t cope. Something’s got to give. In your distress you’re ringing your hands. You notice as you unintentionally scrape the skin on the back of your hand against the ring on your finger the sharp sensation distracts you from these powerful thoughts and feelings. Or, perhaps, you’re digging your fingernails into your palms, which you don’t even realize you’re doing, and that somehow eases the pain in your head… A coping strategy is born…

A few weeks ago I was asked to assist Off the Record – a leading youth support service in Bristol – in delivering training for staff at 1625 Independent People on the subject of self-harm. I’ve worked with this pattern of behaviour for some years so my role was to inform the team of the psychology and physiology of why people deliberately hurt themselves. It was hoped that with a deeper understanding, along with their plentiful experience, the team could formulate an updated organizational policy on how to respond to young people in their care who were self-harming. Jonathan Parker, from Off the Record, lead the training and it was heart-warming to see both the level of care and experience amongst the 1625 I.P. staff.

So, what is happening when someone cuts, burns, scrapes, or otherwise harms themselves? Well, the best place to start is in the body. The application of pain or injury to the body stimulates the sympathetic nervous system and the “fight, fright or freeze” response is activated. This is an automatic evolutionary mechanism that enables human beings to survive in hostile situations by defending themselves by fighting or removing themselves from the circumstances. Pain is numbed and muscles are primed. Awareness is moved away from normal processing – hence awareness of emotional pain or disturbing thoughts becomes significantly reduced.

Recent neurological research has reinforced this understanding of how self-harm provides a concrete form of emotional regulation. One particularly fascinating study (Niedtfeld et al. Affect Regulation & Pain in BPD, Biological Psychiatry 2010) detailed how a collection of Borderline Personality Disordered clients (who have a high prevalence for self-harm) and controls were put in a neuro-imaging scanner and then shown three sets of pictures – “positive” ones (kittens etc), “neutral” ones (eg a chair), and “negative” ones (surgical procedures etc). The pictures were designed to generate the corresponding positive, neutral and negative emotions. The scans showed that people with BDP had mostly more than double the level of brain activity response to the pictures in certain parts of the limbic system. The limbic system is associated with emotion, impulsivity, pleasure, as opposed to the pre-frontal cortex – the logical part of the brain – which helps people to moderate behaviour through thinking. It can be inferred from these observations that the BDP subjects experience a significantly greater level of emotion than the control subjects.

The study then goes on to test what happens to this brain activity when pain is applied in the form of a heat pad to the leg. They used the same people and the same pictures but then introduced the pain. And guess what? The brain activity in response to the pictures (read the emotion) reduced in all cases. Simply put: emotional stimulation + pain = less emotion. It is remarkable that we no longer need to rely on anecdotal evidence or theory to understand the function of self-harm – we can observe these pain reduction effects happening in the brain in real-time.

Other studies have supported these findings and explored them further, leading to a suggestion that it is not the introduction of pain per se, but effective distraction, that moderates the emotion. Hence forms of distraction can be extremely useful in helping clients to cope with states that trigger the desire to self-harm.

More next week on the psychological function that SH fulfills and why self harm stops working

Continuing Personal Development – Training

Yesterday I attended a continuing personal development (CPD) training day in Stroud, an increasingly interesting and alternative town on the edge of old Gloucestershire, thirty miles or so north of Bristol. CPD is the umberella term for ongoing recognised counselling training that counsellors and psychotherapists undertake to to maintain their skills post qualifying. It is required by the accrediting bodies, such as the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), that systematize professional standards in the field of psychotherapy.

I find it a rich and enjoyable process to choose and attend courses, out of the many diverse trainings that are regularly on offer in and around Bristol. Trainings on Ecopsychotherapy, CBT, Mindfulness, EFT, trauma resolution and many more are high on my list, but on this occasion it was the topic of sex that came out on top. Indeed, the title of yesterday’s training was “Sex in the Consulting Room”. Despite the roots of psychology lying in Freud’s central theories about neurosis stemming from unresolved sexual tensions, it seems that there is precious little detailed talk of sex in the modern day consulting room. Even without subscribing to Freud’s arguments, which I don’t, sex is a massive topic and our relationship to it can hold precious information about they way we relate to life. Despite this it seems that non-psychoanalytic models of therapy often don’t arm the budding therapist with practice and training around speaking about it. Perhaps this is also a cultural – British – phenomenon and there’s plenty to be said about modern society’s conflicted, one might say addicted, relationship with sex. The long and the short of it is that, with these different considerations in mind, it seems important to be able to offer clients a welcoming space in which they can sense a therapist’s genuine capacity to talk to whatever level the client would like about sex.

David Slattery, an esteemed psychotherapist who has taught at Bath Centre of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BCPC) and works extensively with couples, was holding the training. His thoughtful facilitation and accepting style of interaction allowed for a day of contained, but nonetheless, candid exploration. Each therapist had the opportunity to look at their own relationship with sex, how comfortable or not they felt talking about it, and to move closer to understanding their own blocks and fears. It has left me considerably more aware of my own responses and reactions, and made it clear how different everyone’s needs are when talking about this subject. Some people might need an open enquiry, some people might find that intrusive and need a more gentle, empathic presence. It was encouraging to see how, when the therapist is able to offer the right conditions through sensitivity and transparency, the client tends to feel able to share what is helpful to them to share.

I come away from the training curious to explore more of my own relationship to this material and more confident to assist clients in their own journeys towards understanding themselves.

Private Counselling Services Bristol

Private Counselling Services Bristol

If you are seeking private, confidential counselling in Bristol to a high standard of sensitivity and professionalism I invite you to contact me about working together. I have over seven years experience of working in the private healthcare system. Most recently, before moving to Bristol, I worked at the flagship Priory hospital in Roehampton, London, so I am well acquianted with needs of individuals requiring a private therapy service.

If you are looking into counselling for the first time it may feel confusing and somewhat daunting. You may be asking yourself: “How do I know what is the right kind of therapy for me? How do I know which therapist will be best for me? What if I don’t get on with the therapist once I’ve begun?” These can seem difficult questions to answer, particularly when under the kinds of pressure that can prompt us to seek help in the first place.

The first thing to consider is what type of therapy do you want? There are lots to choose from but a simple breakdown is given here http://www.mind.org.uk/help/medical_and_alternative_care/making_sense_of_counselling#whatis. It is helpful to find out about the approaches on offer and see which ones seem suited to your personality and aims.

I am an Integrative counsellor, which means I adjust the ways I work according to your needs at any given time. Having trained working with addictions, eating disorders and other compulsive conditions I am adept at addressing behavioural change, which at times requires Cognitive Behavioural Techniques (CBT) and tasks-based interventions. However, my preferred orientation is towards a “person-centred” (Humanistic) approach, in which I look to deeply supporting you through empathy, congruence and acceptance of you and any issues that you bring to therapy. My experience tells me that the most long-lasting change arises through people feeling really listened to, accepted and supported in finding their way through whatever difficulties they are facing. It is therefore vital to work with someone you feel comfortable with and trusting towards.

I offer an initial consultation in which you have the opportunity to ask me anything you’d like to know about the way I work and what to expect from therapy. Through spending this time together you will have a chance to see if you feel comfortable with me. I also then have the chance to assess whether my training and experience are suited to the help you’re looking for.

Another aspect to consider is choosing someone who is well qualified and accredited. Accreditation is the outcome of a lengthy process through which a therapist demonstrates their capability by building up significant counseling experience during their training, and shows understanding of the therapeutic process through case study reports. Credentials can be checked by making an enquiry to the therapist’s accrediting organization. The British Association of Counsellors and Psychotherapists (BACP) or the United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapy (UKCP) are the most widely recognized accrediting bodies in the UK for counselors and psychotherapists. I am accredited with the Federation of Drug and Alcohol Practitioners (FDAP) because I initially studied addiction psychology. I am also a member of BACP, which means I abide by their code of ethics, which can be found at http://www.bacp.co.uk/ethical_framework/.

You can contact me via the form below or simply call me on 07737 092 625. Please feel free to enquire about any aspect of therapy

Private Counselling Services Bristol

Bristol – Confidential Counselling Service

Confidential Counselling Service

There are many reasons that someone might start to suffer from anxiety. There may be a history of anxiety in your family, or you may be experiencing a lot of stress in your life. Anxiety can happen to anyone. If you are feeling anxious, here is some solid advice to help you live a more relaxed life.

You will go a long way toward reducing your anxiety if you learn to accept things as they are. Realize that you cannot control everything in life, and sometimes things will not live up to your expectations. Look at the situation objectively, and realize that matters are not really as bad as you are making them out to be.

Try not to self-medicate with alcohol. When you suffer from anxiety, it can be easy to consume alcohol, in order to reduce your symptoms. Using alcohol to control your anxiety levels, however, is a very bad idea. You will build up a tolerance to the alcohol, and you will have to keep increasing your intake.

Learn to say no. Overextending yourself can quickly drain your reserves and leave your mind racing as you try to live up to your commitments. Your refusal to put more on your plate than you can manage may cause disappointment for someone, but your mental health and well-being are most important.

To help keep anxiety at bay, manage everyday stress. When your stress levels are high, your anxiety tends to increase, too. Learn to delegate tasks and relieve some of the pressures or responsibilities at work or home. Also, make sure that you get plenty of time to unwind and decompress each day.

Know that your anxiety will pass. Millions of people suffer from anxiety, but millions of people also recover. Hope for the best and make sure that you are ready to start feeling better. Look for examples when you find yourself less anxious, and soon you will indeed be less anxious.

Investigate amino acids as a treatment and potential cure for your anxiety. Many people find they are low in certain nutrients and their bodies do not produce enough serotonin. Many good books discuss treatment plans that help you use over-the-counter supplements to reduce or eliminate your anxiety.

Listen to music. However, not just any music will do. The next time you feel your anxiety levels rising, throw on your favorite CD, or playlist. Whether you enjoy the calming sounds of a classical orchestra, or rocking out to 80’s hair metal, you will feel your anxiety melt away with each song you know by heart. Before you know it, the anxiety is reduced, if not gone, and your spirits will be invigorated and renewed.

Anyone can start to have feelings of anxiety. It’s important to know that you aren’t alone. It’s also important to start coping with your anxiety, and the suggestions in this article can help you to do that. Take a deep breath, and make sure that you start taking your life back so you can be happy once again.

Looking for a Confidential Counselling Service in Bristol. Contact me for friendly advice.

Confidential Counselling Service

Anxiety Counselling in Bristol UK

An Integrative Approach To Anxiety Counselling

Are you struggling with feelings of anxiety? If so you are not alone and help is available. I am encountering more and more clients who seek help for precisely this issue. The purpose of this article is to illustrate how I work with people suffering from anxiety so you may have a better idea of what to expect from therapy. If you have any questions relating to this article or how to engage in therapy with me please feel free to contact me.

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As an Integrative counsellor, I use techniques from different psychotherapeutic models to tailor the most effective treatment possible. This means that I can vary how I approach the issues according to each client’s individual character and needs.

Generally speaking I aim to work on two different levels for clients suffering from anxiety issues. First there is the immediate challenge of helping you to understand, manage and reduce your anxiety symtoms. Second comes the task of exploring the underlying tensions that might be “driving” the anxiety experience. This part of the work helps you to maintain freedom from anxiety by recognising your deeper emotional needs and learning to effectively respond to them.

There is ample research to indicate that CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) is effective in helping people recover from anxiety disorders. The CBT model emphasises the impact of our thinking (cognition) on our behaviour. Through getting a better understanding of our thought-processes regarding anxiety – largely maintained by worry – and by learning behavioural tools to change those processes we can make significant progress in changing how we think and, therefore, how we feel. Exploration of these processes is often a significant initial focus of therapy.

As well as talking about your thoughts in connection to the issues you worry about I introduce mindfulness techniques to help you be able to see more clearly what is happening for you. With this increased awareness of your internal landscape, and instruction in relaxation techniques, you then have more capacity to respond effectively to anxiety triggers (both from the outside world and your own inner thoughts or feelings).

 

Ironically, the thought processes that drive anxiety often automatically come into being to distract us from uncomfortable emotions. We may not realise it but our minds are very skillful in helping us avoid emotional and mental pain. They create clever diversions to protect us from difficulties. However, in time the avoidance strategy itself can become a problem and prevent us from resolving the original difficulty. An example of this dynamic is an addiction, wherein the sufferer initially gained relief from pain (whether knowlingly or not) through the addictive behaviour but over time it has taken on a momentum of its own and become destructive. It can be a similar process with any thought process. Hence the need to address your emotional management to achieve a long-lasting recovery from anxiety.

For this aspect of therapy I drawn on humanistic theory, which asserts that each individual has his or her own healing potential within. I find that by giving space, encouragement and honest empathy people are often able to contact this aspect of themselves and bring about large shifts in how they relate to themselves and others.  Thus you become adept at managing your emotional and interpersonal needs.

I have offered a brief and generalised picture of the process of Integrative Psychotherapy for anxiety as I approach it. Of course, everyone has a different set of experiences and personality attributes that they bring to therapy, which means that no two paths to healing are the same. The beauty of the Integrative model is that it allows for these differences and enables me to bring my full training and experience to each therapeutic relationship.

I offer free assessments so you can find out if this approach feels right for you before committing to anything, and am happy to answer any questions you might have. Please feel free to comment below or contact me on 07737 092 625 or info@freddyweaver.co.uk

Anxiety Counselling In Bristol UK

Counselling Services in Bristol

Counselling Services in Bristol

You may feel like the things that are causing the stress in your life such as family, work, and money, are all things that you can’t get rid of, and therefore you will always be stressed about. This article will show you how you can deal with that stress more effectively and possibly eliminate some of it as well. If you’re looking for Counselling Services in Bristol please give us a call.

Adults have responsibilities and a busy life, but that does not mean that you have to be serious all of the time. Sometimes it is necessary not to carry out plans or your next item on the to do list. Every so often you need to take a break.

A great tip that can help you keep your stress levels down is to stop relying on your alarm clock to wake up in the morning. Waking up to an alarm clock can make you very stressed out. Learning to wake up naturally is a much better alternative to an alarm clock.

A great tip that can help you keep your stress levels down is to be careful about which words you use to describe your stress. Avoid using negative words too much because they’ll influence your mood. Try to stick with positive or neutral words as often as you can.

One of the easiest ways to reduce stress in your life is by shutting off the evening news. Today’s news broadcasts are typically filled with nothing but doom and gloom, making them anything but uplifting. In fact, they can leave you feeling downright stressed out and worried. Instead, try skimming the news headlines online to stay informed. Just don’t allow yourself to get bogged down in all the details.

Multitasking is a stress magnet. Many people consider multitasking to be a skill that only certain people have, but in reality, it is just the cause of an extraordinary amount of stress. Some people can better cope with stress but if you are not one of those people, do not multitask.

Listen to calming music. When you are feeling stressed out, one of the best things to do is to put on some soothing music and listen. Have some relaxing music available so that when you start feeling stressed you can just put on some music and distract yourself with the sounds.

Laughter is a very effective, healthy and natural way to reduce stress. Laughing naturally resolves tension and the activities that cause you to laugh can also help take your mind off your issues. A couple of ways you can get yourself to laugh and have a good time are to go out with a friend to a comedy club or rent a comedy to watch.

You don’t have to be stressed out or worried all of the time. This article has shown you lots of ideas on how to reduce your stress level and how to deal with that stress when it does inevitably show up. Pass along this information to a friend as well if you felt that it was helpful.

Counselling in Bristol | Blog